Solid wood

Unique solid wood processing with Felder Group machines.

This is how you process solid wood into furniture.

Make furniture out of whole, naturally grown wood or solid wood panels.

What is solid wood?

Solid wood is the term used to describe wood-based materials that have been extracted from the trunk and further processed without mechanically altering the structure of the wood. The quality concept "solid wood" is strictly standardised, especially in the field of wooden furniture making. Only furniture with all parts (except rear panel and drawer bottoms) made of solid wood may be called solid wood furniture. If veneer (thin sheets of wood on a carrier material) is used for a piece of furniture, this must be indicated to the customer.

What are the advantages of solid wood?

Solid wood furniture has numerous advantages over veneered furniture. The unique grain and natural colouring are inimitable. Solid wood furniture also features a porous structure that prevents dust from becoming electrostatically charged, acts as an antibacterial agent and, last but not least, ensures an optimum room climate thanks to its aesthetic appeal. Solid wood appears in handling and perception to be perceptibly robust, sturdy as well as high-quality and it conveys stability of value for generations.

This is how you process solid wood into furniture.

Solid wood furniture can be manufactured in two ways: From whole, naturally grown wood or from solid wood panels which are processed alone or in combination with naturally grown pieces.

For a solid wood panel (also glued boards or laminated timber), sheets of grown wood or glued lamellas are dried, cut as well as shaped and subsequently joined together permanently in the same grain direction using a panel press. As a result, the wood is relieved of tension, which reduces the risk of cracks and indentations. Also, the absorption and release of moisture in solid wood panels is significantly lower than in natural wood pieces.

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